Dr. Irwin Adam Eydelnant is the Willy Wonka of the 21st century and the man behind Future Food Studio. He combines his extensive scientific background with his passion for food. And the results of this fusion are truly sensational. 
A food and design enthusiast holds a masters degree in Chemical Engineering from McGill University and a PhD in biomedical engineering from University of Toronto. Academia, however, felt too restricting to Eydelnant and so he uses science to revolutionise eating.
 

Where it all began…

Adam worked in an ice cream shop at 12 and then, at 15, he started washing dishes at an Earl’s restaurant in Winnipeg. That began a series of restaurant kitchen jobs as he got a first-hand look at how the food service industry functioned. His interest in food experiments continued though his university life. He made an ambitious attempt to make pasta change colour when it was al dente. “I had the colour change but not when it was cooked, which was a problem.” Fortunately, it was not the end of his extraordinary relationship with food. Business opportunities started throwing themselves at Adam. He was asked to help with a consulting project for PepsiCo. That led to the creation of an edible cloud, which steals the show up to date. It was then clear that his academic knowledge can be a foundation of a successful business in a industry in need of smart solutions.

So, what does he do, exactly? 

There is no simple way to explain what exactly Adam does in his laboratory, which maybe the reason why he is often compared to Willy Wonka. If you can’t fully wrap your head around it – it must be magic! His own website puts it this way: Irwin Adam creates defining multi-sensorial food experiences including products, new technologies, immersive dining installations, and interactive workshops. Others say Adam is part of a new group of flavour architects who blend science, design and technology to intensify taste. Adam himself says the goal of his work is to make people think, make them more intentional and conscientious around food and consumption. Some argue that his projects are too theatrically beautiful, too…fun. Adam’s response to such criticism is simple: everything his team does has multiple levels, so people can enjoy it superficially or go deeper into the science if they wish.
One of Adam’s recent projects was Sensorium (photos above and below). There, he was one of the sensorial experts working together alongside Stella Artois to bring this multi-sensory dinner to life. One particular meal of his received standing ovation. It was a soup. Did you ever see a soup get a standing ovation? Exactly.
Future Food Studio’s Kristina Ruddick shared her thoughts on this with The Creators Project: “When a bowl of soup in front of you comes alive with sound waves caused by the live drummer in the dining dome that feed into individual speakers that lie under each bowl on the 80-foot tables, it was quite unforgettable”. Move over, molecular cuisine. A dancing soup is the next big thing!
Another project of Adam’s that deserves our full attention is BevLab. It is an experimental beverage laboratory reimagining the future of beverage. Basically, even more food magic. The laboratory provides it’s customers with workshops and events with mind-blowing cocktail services. The famous edible cloud is included of course. Other spectacular cocktail services are named: liquid nitrogen, ice sphere and frozen pearls. There is also an option of creating your own beverage cocktail service. Does it get any better?
Apparently, it does. Adam Irwin was also a founding partner of an enterprise no less exciting – a pop up food art exhibit, a Museum of Ice Cream in NYC’s meatpacking district. It was only open for a month in 2016 and surely it was a roaring success. “This is an art installation meets an ice cream shop meets a taste experiment,” Mr. Eydelnant said of the final exhibit he developed: “miracle berry” candies that transform a lemon slice placed on top of a dollop of soft-serve vanilla ice cream into a sweet taste instead of sour. Sorcery!
Yet another venture of Adam’s was Food Loves Tech. A platform, designed to engage the public on the transformations happening right now in food, from how it’s made and transformed to how we experience eating and imagine it tomorrow. There he curated a series of installations that explored the intersection of food and technology.
Food is such a huge part of our lives that it is nearly trivial. Dr. Adam proves that it doesn’t have to be and so, transforming the way we eat is at the heart of his projects. No doubt, It is extremely intriguing to see what he concocts next!
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