The modern world has long set a course for liberalization and blurring of gender borders in all areas of life. What to say about fashion and beauty that ceases to be exclusively female privilege. 

Recently a well-known cosmetic brand CoverGirl introduced his first-boy model. They became the 17 year-old James Charles of New York. His Instagram account, where James published his images, for the year of existence gained 650,000 users.

First steps

And this is not the only example. The constantly increasing number of bloggers gathers millions of patients with beauty people. Makeup artists Manny Gutierrez and Patrick Simondac, who in one Instagram collected more than 5 million subscribers in the sum. It seems that something went wrong in the gender situation. Previously the coolest girls called “it-girl”, now we can talk about men this way as well. Of course, in the beauty industry men has always attended. The pioneers in the early 90s were Kevyn Aucoin and Wayne Goss. Now in the Internet modern beauty-guys attracted huge audiences.

And the other boy from the UK Lewys Ball became interested in the beauty industry in 14 years. Then to find video instructions on men was unreal. Now he takes his video. But the first few trips to the store were very unusual. «I was so embarrassed I did not even look at shades for anything and just picked the first products I had seen YouTubers talk about», he said.

Marc Zapanta, a university student who has been making videos for two years, said that the competition has increased due to the expansion of beauty industry. People pay attention to them because it is different from the usual.

Male Beauty Blogging. Marc Zapanta

 

Beauty without borders

For many men this is not just a success working with cosmetic brands, but the disclosure of its internal talent. This year has been a successful for collaborations. Brands have stopped to consider the beauty is for women only. Dominic Smales, CEO of Gleam, believes the audience of bloggers grows and becomes more interested in the beauty product. Maybe other brands will use a similar technique.

Gen Z, that after millennials, is more gender-fluid than any previous generation. 81 percent do not consider gender of a person says something about it, and 56 percent use the word “they” to impart people. The fact that now companies are often using LGBT in advertisements does not mean that the embarrassment is gone, but they do not stand out, like 10 years ago.

L’Oréal Paris also submitted U.K. blogger The Plastic Boy (Gary Thompson) in its campaign for TrueMatch foundation. Here already the rest of brands had to connect to the general trend.

Male Beauty Blogging. L'oreal. YourTruly Campaign

Other points

On the other hand according to Tammy Smulders, global managing director at Havas LohNuv, simple cosmetic brands fall into the network of competition who are innovative. While people follow someone easier to repeat, but men do not always match this criteria. In addition, his research showed that men do not likely to use color. Though they are interesting in terms of appearance.

One can not say how many men are colored and what they use, but male-centric products clearly have already existed. As Jake-Jamie, aka The Beauty Boy, the blogger behind the viral #MakeupIsGenderless campaign, admit colored men feel uncomfortable seeing only women present cosmetics. “It’s 2016 — we live in a very modern world. A huge amount of men are wearing makeup and have done for years, but it’s like a private members club that everybody seems to keep top secret!”

 

Male Beauty Blogging. Benefit Cosmetics Instagram

 

Benefit Cosmetics partnered with male beauty bloggers like Manny Mua. 95 percent of its following are women. But it can be so men are using products on behalf of women. All in all never mind who in ads. Like Stoodley said: “As long as you’re great in front of the camera, it doesn’t matter what gender you are”. 

The only thing still does not clear is purpose of brands. Do they tend to attract the same females or expand gender field of cosmetics application.

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