Everyone has his own way to deal with hard or controversial emotions. Someone just angry with the whole world, someone directs all his energy into art. Defective Barbie decided to pour out her feelings in drippy watercolor paintings. It was enough for a an entire exhibition.

At SugarMynt Gallery in Pasadena exposition called The Drip Effect. This drippy watercolor paintings are children of Defective Barbie, which ranged from portraits to abstraction. All of paintings is a result of “chaotic free flowing paint”. It seems like movement as they want to leave the canvas.

 

Defective Barbie

 

The real Defective Barbie name is Christina Leta.  Her work has been featured in commercial projects such as the cover of Pacific San Diego Magazine, brochure for the AGES Annual Scientific Meeting in Brisbane, Australia, & as a contributing artist for Blick Art Materials. But first works were postcard that a friend received in the email. Leta loved it and wanted to make work that looked just as “expressive, wild and captivating.”

Defective Barbie

If you look only from one side pictures remind fabulous fairies and illustrations of dreams. But if you look closely, you can see alarm tones: the look, colors, streaks. The talk inside is about complicated issues like identity and mental health. Such technics put the shade of destruction. Just like what emotions make with person.

“Honesty is an important part of my art, I want it to be raw, visceral, and inspiring,” Defective Barbie writes in an email to The Creators Project. “I think it’s important to honor both the beauty and the ugliness life entails because one couldn’t exist without the other, so I couldn’t imagine capturing the essence of a person in a portrait without elements that are both unnerving & appealing.”

Defective Barbie

Defective Barbie

Despite the openness of work it is personal and based on her own thoughts.

“Having experienced depression myself, I’ve always dealt with it through my art,” writes Leta. “I believe there is a stigma associated with depression that I wanted to confront. In my journey as an artist, the most important realization I’ve had was finding the beauty and strength from having suffered pain and debilitation.”

Leta hopes that visitors share in her sense of catharsis. The pieces are a means to start a conversation, or at least a reassurance that visitors not the only ones caught in battles that can oftentimes feel isolating.

“It’s unnerving to exhibit work that’s so revealing of my personal experience, but I’m not alone with my emotions and the most interesting part is hearing what others see of themselves reflected in each painting,” writes Leta.

Defective Barbie

Defective Barbie

Many of these works do not seem new. Yes, they are beautiful. But  agree to sell just fine pictures becomes difficult. It is necessary that the work has a story behind, kind of philosophy. And if it is also close to each viewer, it gives something to think about, then you are moving in the right direction.

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