Much has been written about the pre-Nirvana period of American punk-rock, but there’s never been an examination of DC’s contribution. A journalist and filmmaker Scott Crawford took it in hand and kickstarted Salad Days. Crawford put his heart in it and after four years the film is finally finished. Today his plan is to go back to Iggy’s 70s with his new documentary.

This Is Hardcore

SALAD DAYS  is a documentary-in-progress that examines the fertile Washington, DC punk scene of the 1980s. This was a particularly important time in the evolution of punk and independent music, with DC-based bands like Bad Brains, Black Market Baby, the Faith, the Slickee Boys, Void, Government Issue, 9353, Beefeater, Scream, Rites of Spring, Fugazi, Nation of Ulysses, and others defining the DC aesthetic. The documentary tells us how in a small city, which industry is a government, a creative energetic hardcore punk movement appeared and how influential it really became. A Variety Magazine called it “…a solid, borderline exhaustive survey of the Washington, D.C. hardcore punk scene of 1980-s – possibly the nation’s most influential such milieu”.

The Story of Confrontation

The documentary tells us how in a small city, which industry is a government, a creative energetic hardcore punk movement appeared and how influential it really became. According to the director, the documentary is about the power of one’s proper persuasions and about one’s readiness to change a status quo in a city, which holds on it. A Variety Magazine called it “…a solid, borderline exhaustive survey of the Washington, D.C. hardcore punk scene of 1980-s – possibly the nation’s most influential such milieu”.

The SPOKE

Firstly Scott Crawford wanted to write a book about the movement but soon understood paper would not reproduce one hell important thing – the music. However, today the SPOKE is coming out, which is a kind of paper collection of interviews and stories Crawford introduced in his documentary. That’s way the audience will never miss a thing as Crawford took care of both impulsive and narrative sides of the story.

 

CREEM: America’s Only Rock ‘N’ Roll Magazine

For his next doc, Crawford goes back to Detroit in the 1970s—the time of Iggy and the MC5—which inspired the launch of a new magazine called CREEM.  CREEM is known as the second-most-popular music magazine in the country, after Rolling Stone. However, they call it the only one. The Documentary Boy Howdy! The Story of CREEM: America’s Only Rock ‘N’ Roll Magazine is now on Kickstarter. “This is a story that J.J. Kramer (Barry Kramer’s son and onetime heir to the CREEM throne) has wanted to tell his entire life. J.J. will be producing the film—and his trust in the filmmakers to tell this story the right way was instrumental in getting this project underway”, – says it’s description page.

Everyone loved CREEM for the energy of their reports. They made people feel like they are in a show they are reading about. They were the voice of their time, a legendary magazine founded by writers and photographers with no publishing experience at all. It was started by Barry Cramer, an owner of Detroit record store. Lester Bangs often cited as “America’s Greatest Rock Critic”, became editor in 1971. The term “punk rock” was coined by the magazine in May 1971, in Dave Marsh’s Looney Tunes column.

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