As a law undergrad, shopping away her student loan, Carrie Green solved her money issues by building a mobile unlocking business. Financially beneficial as it was, her online enterprise left Carrie feeling isolated and so she went off to create the Female Entrepreneur Association that now inspires women all over the world. 

 

The career roller coaster…

Completing a law degree, running a successful business on the side, defending it from a major law firm…what do you know about multi-tasking? Carrie Green definitely polished this skill over the years of her entrepreneurial journey. At the age of 20 she set up “Ease Mobile Unlock”, which was running itself by the time Carrie was 23. Having gained some financial freedom from her online business, Carrie realised it was neither her passion nor her dream: “I was stuck in Birmingham doing my business. I outsource everything, so I was stuck to talking to people in India all day and wondering how can I have such a successful business and be so miserable.”

A career path in law also didn’t seem right:

I loved building my own business. I loved the freedom of it, I loved coming up with my own ideas and turning them into a reality

 

And so she did. A desire to leave a positive legacy and make a real difference led her to creating the successful online platform: the Female Entrepreneur Association. Through this platform, Carrie hopes to inspire and empower women to make amazing things happen. It is a place where women from around the world can share their stories, experiences and advice about building their business, it helps those interested in business to keep motivated and overcome challenges.

…And what it led to

56 women turned up at the first event Carrie set up.

Now, there are over 400,000 women involved from around the world, as well as the private members group which is an incredible network of over 4000 female entrepreneurs. The website also features weekly videos that cover a wide range of topics, from how to programme your mind for success, to how to systemise your business. Then there are online masterclasses on how to market your business on Pinterest, how to build your list using Facebook, how to generate more leads and so on. And of course there is a blog full of tips, tricks, things to try and more. To add to all this, there is a free, digital magazine published once a month called This Girl Means Business, which features how-tos, interviews, inspiration and strategies for building a successful business.

 

Among all things FEA features, one deserves special attention. That is the personal stories of the female entrepreneurs. As Carrie pointed out:

One of the main focuses of the Female Entrepreneur Association is the stories we publish about inspiring female entrepreneurs. They are really uplifting and go to show what’s possible.

There are sections like: “Hobby to Business”, “Overcame a personal challenge”, “Quit Job Started Business”, “Spotted an opportunity at work”, “Mum Entrepreneurs” and “Student Entrepreneurs”. You could also search stories by age or country, so there is absolutely any type of entrepreneurial inspiration one may be looking for. The stories  published on FEA are honest and frank and tell the journeys of the good times and the bad times of different people. In Carries own words:

I hope everything that my team and I have created can help comfort the people that are feeling confused or miserable, because everyone has times like that – it’s just that not many people like to talk about it.

Recently, there has been an addition to the long list of Carrie’s achievements: her book “She Means Business”. Unsurprisingly, it received nearly 100% of five-star reviews on Amazon. Surely, the more inspiration there is to keep like-minded female entrepreneurs motivated, the better!

Carrie Green is yet another Girl Boss to watch and be inspired by. And so are the thousands of women on the Female Entrepreneur Association, supporting and motivating each other on the not-so-easy entrepreneurial path. 

 

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