Brandon McClain, a.k.a. Eat Humans, is gaining popularity photographer, who captures rebellious spirit in his pictures. The artist’s style is unique and strange. His photos attract and shock. Who is this person, who creates on the brink of a foul? We have checked out McClain’s interviews and tried to find out who is hiding behind the mask of Eat Humans.

Stages

I hated where I lived, in Acworth, Georgia, and I just needed something to keep me sane.

When I got a camera, everything got interesting. I remember I would see this basketball hoop every day, and it was just slowly growing into a tree. That’s one of my favorite things I’ve ever photographed. I started seeing the beauty in [Acworth] and seeing the beauty of everything in it.

All my friends are rappers, so that’s just who I shot. Then everyone got interested. Especially when I moved to Atlanta, because everyone wants to know what’s going on here with Atlanta rappers.

Shit is beautiful

I like to take pictures of things and places that seem forgotten or lonely.

My photos are about wanting to be understood really. I feel like a defender of beauty that’s not considered pretty. There’s definitely a dark side to my photos, though. When I started shooting people, I really wanted to show that side of them. I want that to translate.

I just want to show people that everything is beautiful. I want people to know that no matter where you are, no matter what town you’re in, if you feel helpless where you are, there’s beauty there. There’s art to be made. I make it a point to shoot in very remote places. It’s crazy that so many people just fly by these small moments that look like nasty, disgusting shit, but it’s so beautiful. It’s just everywhere.

Everyone has their own creative process and no one should feel bad about the way they create. So I just keep shooting and staying on my path, I know it’ll lead me to where I need to be.

Inspiration

Street photography and photojournalism is what got me into photography initially. Then later on I began to discover more fine art and experimental types of photographs. I guess I fall somewhere in between both of them.

My biggest influences are Diane Arbus, William Eggleston and Harmony Korine. I connected with Diane Arbus’s work and story because she sought out the most unusually people, she saw beauty in people and things that most people didn’t and that is the very purpose of my artwork. William Eggleston’s work is still by far my favorite. He can take a photograph of literally anything and it’ll be beautiful. Harmony Korine’s work taught me that my imagination and the ordinary things around me are enough to create something thought-provoking and genuinely unique.

Larry Clark‘s photograph of a woman shooting heroin while she was pregnant, that photo always stuck with me. It’s possibly one of the saddest, yet most beautiful photographs I’ve ever seen. I’ve always wondered how you can take photos of people in their darkest moments so beautifully without it seeming like you want to exploit them.

What is art?

Not everyone can take a photograph that makes your jaw drop, not everyone can take a photograph that makes you look at your surroundings differently, makes you pay attention to the little details. Not everyone can take a photograph that makes you cry, or frightens you, or gives you chills or haunts you. I’ve experienced so many emotions looking at photographs over the years. Photography is by far my favorite form of art.

I am a fan and a student of photography before anything else. There’s nothing better to me than opening one of my favorite photographer’s books and losing myself in how they view the world.

 

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